What’s the Opposite of an Eating Disorder – Video with Emily Rosen

It’s quite easy these days to read all kinds of books, articles, blogs and more on eating disorders. This is a deeply important and compelling topic for our times. So many people are living in pain and confusion not knowing how to manage their unwanted eating, their weight, or their emotional challenges with food. But have we really explored what an ideal relationship with food could look like? Have we even considered the principles that might define the opposite of an eating disorder? In this fascinating video from IPEtv, Emily Rosen, Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating shares about this very topic. She articulates 18 great principles that characterize a healthy and happy relationship with food. We think this is quite an eye-opening list. Why not see how many of these you apply to your own experience of eating!

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Here is a transcript of this week’s video:

Hi, I’m Emily Rosen, Chief Operating Officer for the Institute for the Psychology of Eating.

Today’s Topic: What’s the Opposite of An Eating Disorder?

It’s quite easy these days to read all kinds of books, articles, blogs and more on eating disorders and disordered eating. These are deeply important and compelling topics for our times. So many people are living in pain and confusion not knowing how to manage their unwanted eating, their weight, or their emotional challenges with food.

Let’s take a few minutes and give some airtime to a different view on eating disorders.

Let’s answer the question of what is the opposite of disordered eating.

Linguistically, the answer is ORDERED EATING.

It doesn’t sound too sexy, but I think there’s something important here. Perhaps we can simply ask, what is a harmonious approach to eating, if indeed there is such a thing?

Here’s a collection of 18 great principles for eating. These principles are as free of nutritional dogma as possible, and as a result, they can be applied to almost any nutritional approach.

Here goes:

Principle #1 Intention
We eat because we choose to eat, not because we are compelled to do so through habit.

#2 Presence
We eat with awareness of the body, taking notice of the atmosphere, the people we’re with, taste, texture, posture, chewing, aroma, and all the sensations of the eating experience.

#3 Reflection
We actively listen for the body’s feedback: Did the food help or hinder the body, and what can we do next time to ensure a more fulfilling meal?

#4 Exploration
We see eating as a learning process, an ongoing journey through the unknown where both diet and body are continuously changing.

#5 Transformation
We see our relationship with food, and any challenges we might face with it, as an opportunity to grow and transform.

#6 Nourishment
We understand that food nourishes us through its quality, how it was grown, who prepared it, how we eat it, and the way we share it with others.

#7 Personality
We understand that our food choices are intimately connected to our personal preferences, and the way we choose to live in this world.

#8 Natural Cycles
We include seasonal foods in our diet to benefit from the wisdom of evolution.

#9 Local
We include locally produced foods in our diet to support our community and benefit from bioregional nutrition.

#10 Synergy
We understand that diet works in synergy with factors such as exercise, sleep cycles, breathing patterns, emotions, work styles and more.

#11 Community
We recognize that sharing a meal with others can be a beautiful nutritional act.

#12 Intimacy
We embrace that eating may be a deeply personal experience.

#13 Connection
We are aware that eating connects us to the earth, soil, animals, plants, and waters, and that by nourishing them in thoughtful ways, we nourish ourselves.

#14 Spontaneity
We embrace strategic rule-breaking with a smile.

#15 Kindness
We recognize that judging another for what they eat is an old and outdated approach, and that care and respect is the way.

#16 Joy
We smile when we eat.

#17 Gratitude
We notice that being grateful is a powerful nutrient.

#18 Love
We remember that no matter what our challenges with food or body might be, that love is always a reliable solution.

So, in a day and age where we speak so much about disordered eating and eating disorders, these are our 18 principles of ORDERED eating. I hope you can choose some of these that inspire you the most, and see if you can take your relationship with food to a whole new place.

I hope this was helpful.

To learn more about us, please go to psychologyofeating.com.

The Institute for the Psychology of Eating offers the most innovative and inspiring professional trainings, public programs, conferences, online events and lots more in the exciting fields of Dynamic Eating Psychology and Mind Body Nutrition! In our premier professional offering – the Eating Psychology Coach Certification Training – you can grow a new career and help your clients in a powerful way with food, body and health. You’ll learn cutting-edge skills and have the confidence to work with the most compelling eating challenges of our times: weight, body image, overeating, binge eating, digestion, fatigue, immunity, mood, and much more. If you’re focused on your own eating and health, the Institute offers a great selection of one-of-a-kind opportunities to take a big leap forward in your relationship with food. We’re proud to be international leaders in online and live educational events designed to create the breakthroughs you want most. Our public programs are powerful, results-oriented, and embrace all of who we are as eaters – body, mind, heart, and soul.

Please email us at info@psychologyofeating.com if you have specific questions and we will be sure to get back to you.

Again, that is psychologyofeating.com.

This is Emily Rosen, Chief Operating Officer for the Institute for the Psychology of Eating.

Thanks so much for your time and interest.

To learn more about the breakthrough body of work we teach here at the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, please sign up for our free video training series at ipe.tips. You’ll learn about the cutting-edge principles of Dynamic Eating Psychology and Mind Body Nutrition that have helped millions forever transform their relationship with food, body, and health. Lastly, we want to make sure you’re aware of our two premier offerings. Our Eating Psychology Coach Certification Training is an 8 month distance learning program that you can take from anywhere in the world to launch a new career or to augment an already existing health practice. And Transform Your Relationship with Food is our 8 week online program for anyone looking to take a big leap forward with food and body.

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  • Gill Bell

    Another beautiful and insightful video from the Institute for the Psychology of Eating

    • Dear Gill, Thank you so much for your comment! I’m so glad you liked the video! Warmly, Emily

About The Author
Emily Rosen
CEO

Emily Rosen is the Director of the Institute for the Psychology of Eating, where she oversees business development strategies, student affairs, marketing and public relations in addition to her role as Senior Teacher. With an extensive and varied background in nutritional science, counseling, natural foods, the culinary arts, conscious sex education, mind body practices, business management and marketing, Emily brings a unique skill-set to her role at the Institute. She has also been a long-term director and administrator for Weight Loss Camps and Programs serving teens and adults and has held the position of Executive Chef at various retreat centers. Her passion for health and transformation has provided her the opportunity to teach, counsel, manage, and be at the forefront of the new wave of professionals who are changing the way we understand the science and psychology of eating and sexuality. Emily is also co -founder of the Institute for Conscious Sexuality and Relationship.